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Front Suspension Torque Specs Rear Lower Control Arm/Tie Rods ???

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Front Suspension Torque Specs Rear Lower Control Arm/Tie Rods ???

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Old 03-13-18, 11:25 AM
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shwalker07
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Default Front Suspension Torque Specs Rear Lower Control Arm/Tie Rods ???

Hello all,

Searched everywhere and could not find anything but dead links or no information. Of course you can also get a feel of how tight these bolts should be but I want to to the job right and a functioning tsrm or a front suspension torque diagram would be nice.

I am looking for the front torque specs for the 3 bolts on the rear lower control arm that looks like this:
https://www.rockauto.com/en/moreinfo...426047&jsn=334

Also looking for the the outer tie rod nut (believe it is 45 ft. lbs) and the inner tie rod to rack torque specs.

Thank you all for your help.
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Old 03-13-18, 01:28 PM
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You can find PDFs of the service manual on the site. Hope this helps you, they're from the service manual:
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Old 03-13-18, 02:39 PM
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LexusK
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Sorry to thread jack, but I have a super noob question.. I've always wondered this but never asked til now. How do I know I am torquing to spec? As an example, lets say I am tightening my lug nuts. I usually just tighten until I can't anymore. I don't necessarily over tighten it and keep trying to force it though. Is this enough or is it still considered to be over tightening?
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Old 03-13-18, 03:15 PM
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Originally Posted by LexusK View Post
Sorry to thread jack, but I have a super noob question.. I've always wondered this but never asked til now. How do I know I am torquing to spec? As an example, lets say I am tightening my lug nuts. I usually just tighten until I can't anymore. I don't necessarily over tighten it and keep trying to force it though. Is this enough or is it still considered to be over tightening?

To tighten to torque specs. You need to have a torque wrench to begin with. You dial in the inch lbs, or ft lbs on your wrench. Then you proceeded to tighten the bolt, or nut until you hear the tool click. You have successfully tightened to the torque spec called out.


https://youtu.be/3v3hLvuO_KU
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Old 03-13-18, 04:39 PM
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Use a torque wrench. lug nuts , i torque my car wheel 76fps.
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Old 03-13-18, 11:37 PM
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Thanks Muffinizer. Do you have a direct link or a download link for the whole service manual?

LexusK - You should always use a torque wrench with most auto repairs and a standard click type with a bottom dial works good. I keep 3 different ones in different ratings 1/4 (smaller torque specs up to 200in. lbs), 3/8 (for most standard torque specs 20 to 100ft. lbs) and a 1/2 (for high torque specs 20 to 150ft. lbs). Good to also keep them at 0 when storing them as well because over time the torque values will change with wear and tear and should be recalibrated later on.

Like the lug nuts you were talking about some vehicles use as low as 65ft. lbs and some heavy duty trucks I worked on seen up to 165ft.lbs. Most Toyota/Lexus cars use 76-80ft. lbs and some of their truck's/suv's are around 110ft. lbs.
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Old 03-14-18, 04:45 PM
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Originally Posted by LexusK View Post
Sorry to thread jack, but I have a super noob question.. I've always wondered this but never asked til now. How do I know I am torquing to spec? As an example, lets say I am tightening my lug nuts. I usually just tighten until I can't anymore. I don't necessarily over tighten it and keep trying to force it though. Is this enough or is it still considered to be over tightening?
I wouldn't do that. I used to be cocky and would torque my lug nuts by "feel" until I ended up snapping a stud off on an MR2 I had. Now I spend the extra 5 minutes to pull my torque wrench out. Studs are a ***** to replace and you'll probably end up either snapping one off or stripping it out.
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Old 03-16-18, 11:10 PM
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Found them. Just in case anyone else is looking for these specs as well here they are.

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