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How to remove stuff from paint?! Please help!

 
Old 03-26-19, 06:19 PM
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philipcruz
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Default How to remove stuff from paint?! Please help!

I am not sure what it is but its like a hard green thing (almost like street paint) or something that you can feel if you put your hand over it and is extremely difficult to come off with my fingernail. What would you guys do to take it off? I tried using a razor blade but all that did was scratch my paint. So what would you use to take it off? Go Gone doesnt work. PLEASE HELP!

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Old 03-27-19, 08:41 AM
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vwynn
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Have you tried claying? if that doesnt work high grit wet sand paper + polish after.
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Old 04-06-19, 06:59 PM
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skjos
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I've had good luck with 3M General Purpose Adhesive Cleaner 08984. I had yellow road stripping on my GX and it took it off with a little (OK a lot) of elbow grease.
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Old 04-08-19, 11:32 AM
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TDC1
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Maybe try acetone. I talked a detailer a while ago about removing paint transfers. He recommended buying acetone from a hardware store and apply a little using a cloth. It worked perfectly for what I needed. It was surprisingly easy to wipe off the paint transfer without damaging any original paint.
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Old 04-09-19, 01:19 PM
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Originally Posted by TDC1 View Post
Maybe try acetone. I talked a detailer a while ago about removing paint transfers. He recommended buying acetone from a hardware store and apply a little using a cloth. It worked perfectly for what I needed. It was surprisingly easy to wipe off the paint transfer without damaging any original paint.
Acetone ... absolutely not !#!#!
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Old 04-09-19, 01:26 PM
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If “goo gone” or a “clay bar w/quick wax” doesn’t work... it’s staying. Lol
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Old 04-09-19, 01:30 PM
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Originally Posted by MrJason View Post
If “goo gone” or a “clay bar w/quick wax” doesn’t work... it’s staying. Lol
Agree ... probably a catalyst based paint where solvents won't make a dent without damage to surrounding clear coat.
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Old 04-09-19, 02:14 PM
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TDC1
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Originally Posted by ASE View Post
Acetone ... absolutely not !#!#!
I'm curious...why not acetone? I used it without any issues to the original paint.
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Old 04-09-19, 02:24 PM
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Originally Posted by TDC1 View Post
I'm curious...why not acetone? I used it without any issues to the original paint.
Quick superficial pass is OK but beyond that will cloud the clear coat.
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Old 04-09-19, 03:50 PM
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Acetone works great if you have a nice layer of wax on your paint.
It can also be very useful if you dilute it properly. But I’ve seen several people damage paint with concentrate.

Yes it got the substance off and looked good until you put the area under proper lighting. You could then see how the “shine” was no longer on the area they cleaned.

But it as long as you keep a nice thick coat of wax over the area... you can’t tell. Just not usually worth the damage for whatever small area that needed to be cleaned.
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Old 04-09-19, 03:52 PM
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Originally Posted by MrJason View Post
Acetone works great if you have a nice layer of wax on your paint.
It can also be very useful if you dilute it properly. But I’ve seen several people damage paint with concentrate.

Yes it got the substance off and looked good until you put the area under proper lighting. You could then see how the “shine” was no longer on the area they cleaned.

But it as long as you keep a nice thick coat of wax over the area... you can’t tell. Just not usually worth the damage for whatever small area that needed to be cleaned.
Solving one problem by creating another ... what's the gain ?
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Old 04-09-19, 04:17 PM
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Originally Posted by ASE View Post
Solving one problem by creating another ... what's the gain ?
exactly....

id suggest taking it by a dealer and going to talk with the guy who details used cars.
He will take care of it for $20.

Im not joking either.
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Old 04-17-19, 03:07 PM
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RVA350
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After exhausting all options (use this as the ultimate backup):

Go to paint shop (auto body shop). Find the coolest looking employee and pull him aside. Show him and explain. Likely he will apply a pinch of paint lacquer and or 2-3 different types of clothes. Lacquer which is used to clean paint guns is very strong stuff. As a regular joe civilian you cannot buy this type of lacquer it is a hazmat chemical and is prohibited for sale of personal use. You cannot pour it down drains or throw away in a regular container...other much weaker lacquer yes that is available but often you will have to apply so much pressure to the vehicles affected panels that it will blemish the clear and/or base (color). Leaving discoloration and or scratches in the clear. If too much is applying it will weaker the clear. Hell: show him this thread. If he doesn’t understand he’s not the guy you want—>seek out next coolest guy there.

It should come off, if it doesn’t you will have to get the panel(s) painted. Plain and simple. If pro grade auto lacquer doesn’t take it off nothing will...not buffing, not some detail chemicals...nothing.

Make sure to tell him or her not to apply reducer (reducer has its place but directly applying straight reducer will eat through the clear and into the paint) if it is used that’s practically a guarantee it will be left blemished. Think of it like this: reducer is used to weaken or thin out base paint (color) and to promote proper mixing; lacquer is the equivalent to bleach for paint. Often guys at auto body shops (with the exception of the main or head painter) do not understand or know the difference between reducer and lacquer so they will use whatever. Do not ask to speak to the painter. Ask the coolest most relaxed looking guy, painters are *******s and it is a high stress job underpaid job. They often will put far too much on or apply too much pressure and then you will have to get it painted and of course they will finagle you into having them paint it.

I don’t recommend you do this yourself despise however much education YouTube or a detail forum will tell you. Lacquer can eat away your clearcoat and/or add new scratches to the surface. Let the professionals do it. There are multiple types of lacquer and lacquer based products. The professional auto grade cleaning lacquer is only sold in two fashions: 5gallon metal hard shell anti-tip container or a 55gallon hazmat metal lined drum. This stuff you cannot outright buy anywhere in a brick and mortar store or have it sold to you online. Anything at a hardware store or auto store is diluted heavily. The stuff we use if you were to brush silver wheels with it long enough they will be left as an unfinished black base wheel. Keep it away from any and all plastic(s). It will permanently discolor and eat away at the plastic. Think: trim pieces. Protect them.

Tip the guy $20/$30. If it takes him more than three minutes he doesn’t know what he’s doing and likely has already ripped through the clear coat which will begin to deteriorate in short period of time.

My resume?
***5yrs auto body experience as an all around fill in guy and shop manager; not a painter but can paint and fill in when painter(s) needed a break or vacation. It took me hanging around a painter everyday for my first 2 yrs straight to understand how paint works...there are so many products out there and a lot of ways you could unknowingly damage your paint or clear. Seen it happen way too many times and most of which were guys who said, “well, but...I saw this guy on YouTube do this/use product X...will that work?” This particular painter i was around has been painting for 30-35yrs. He painted between 5-10 single/double/triple panel jobs everyday along with 2-3 entire vehicles (all-over). In a single day with just all-over’s depending on size it could be between 5-8 entire vehicles a day. Any paint/damage or clear questions from anybody on here feel free to PM me.

Last edited by RVA350; 04-17-19 at 03:11 PM.
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