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Gas Mileage for 2014 GX460

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Old 07-01-14, 08:12 AM   #16
JohnJerk
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Got 22.7 on a six hour trip this past weekend driving 78-80 mph most of the time. Cargo area was pretty full. Actual calculated not relying on dash display. I am really pleased with that! Not only that gas was much cheaper in KY and TN than it is here in WV.
I hit this same exact number too on a 300 mile road trip according to the computer. I targeted 75 on a hilly secondary highway with many passes of slower vehicles. Very pleased and I attributed to the summer gas efficiency.
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Old 07-01-14, 01:04 PM   #17
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I hit this same exact number too on a 300 mile road trip according to the computer. I targeted 75 on a hilly secondary highway with many passes of slower vehicles. Very pleased and I attributed to the summer gas efficiency.
What is "summer gas efficiency"?
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Old 07-01-14, 03:23 PM   #18
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What is "summer gas efficiency"?
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Summer blend fuel has more energy in it VS winter blend. I wish I could purchase summer blend fuel year round.
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Old 07-01-14, 04:09 PM   #19
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I think 93 will make better MPG than 91, but not sure?
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Old 07-01-14, 06:54 PM   #20
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Summer blend fuel has more energy in it VS winter blend. I wish I could purchase summer blend fuel year round.
Deepening on where you live you can buy a personal tank and pump and buy gas in bulk, not any cheaper really but you can stock up. I have friends in my area who have them and run summer blend all winter, I'm so jealous.
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Old 07-01-14, 10:35 PM   #21
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A copy and paste:

Itís easy to notice some differences about gasoline. If you pull up to the pump, there are often two or three nozzles per station covering the different octane ratings recommend for some cars.* There may also be separate pumps specifically for diesel** or E85. But for the bulk of us who pull up, pump in a tank of regular unleaded, and roll out; how many are aware that the gas in July is different than the gas in January.

Sometimes thereís a brief mention of a shift from ďsummer blendĒ to ďwinter blendĒ or vice versa in the news. Though equally or more often itís a quiet shift that occurs June 1st and September 15th. Just as under the radar as when it changes is what the point of the change is. People hear ďwinter blendĒ gasoline and think itís supposed to help make sure your car starts when itís -10įF below zero and your coffee froze in itís travel mug. And in fact, some gas producers tend to spin it this way as the winter blend is more volatile, and thus ignites a bit easier in cold engines. But this is just a side benefit.

First off, letís define what weíre calling gasoline. Itís toxic, readily flammable, and surprisingly translucent considering it usually comes from some variant of crude oil. Chemically, it is a mix of molecules made up of hydrogen and carbon, with carbon being these moleculesí backbone. These types of molecules are called hydrocarbons (hydrogen & carbonÖ get it?).

There are plenty of rules and regulations regarding what can actually be in gasoline. The molecules can vary but pretty much must have between 4 and 12 carbon molecules. Less than this and you have molecules than are gases (think propane which has 3 carbon atoms or natural gas whose molecules are 1 or 2 carbon atoms long) and thus arenít going to readily flow into your carís tank or work with how your engine is designed. More than 12 carbon molecules and you get something more sludgy or less volatile and thus hard to burn. Diesel has molecules that are 8 to 21 carbons and as such requires a compression ignition engine instead of a gasoline vehicleís spark ignition engine. Thereís also limits to types of molecules since crude oil and itís variants arenít just a mix of natural gas, gasoline, and pure American spirit. For example benzene has 6 carbon atoms and is a natural component of crude oil. Exposure limits for benzene start at 1 part per million when inhaled, so making sure itís not in the mix of gasoline is important. No one wants to get bone marrow cancer just because they didnít wear a respirator while filling up their tank.

So whatís the difference between summer and winter blends? Well, itís important to note that butane (4 carbons) is relatively cheap. Molecules with more carbon atoms are more valuable since itís easier to break molecules down than build them up. Which means that refineries looking to make the most money want gasoline blends that have the most shorter chain molecules while still having a mixture that is stable enough not to evaporate during the distribution process. Itís also important to note that butane has less energy by volume than longer chain hydrocarbons.

In the summer, itís warm out. Which is nice for swimming, but bad for living in a world where we have tanks of hydrocarbons all over; zipping around us, stored in our garage, buried at gas stations, airports, and vehicle fleet facilities, etc. When itís warm, things evaporate easier, and shorter molecules evaporate easier than larger molecules (they are more ďvolatileĒ). Reducing the volatility of gas cuts evaporative emissions, which contribute to ground level ozone and related environmental and health problems. So regulations were put in place to protect us and dictate that summer blend gasoline have to effectively be heavier (less volatile, more longer chain molecules).

In winter, itís cold, and so refineries are allowed to produce gasoline that evaporates more easily. So they maximize the cheap, low energy butane in the mix. Any benefit of your car starting more readily is really limited to old and/or poorly maintained vehicles. Current vehicle technology is pretty hardy.

Whatís the result? Well, basically, winter blend gasoline has a larger percentage of butane in it. And since butane is cheaper and has less energy, winter blend thus costs less and gives us a lower MPG when we burn it. So itís a wash, right? Eh, maybe. Your vehicle miles per gallon typically will drop 2-8% when you start filling up with winter blend. Unfortunately, evidence suggests that the common price decline is 2-4%. Of course this price change can easily be lost in the noise of a global commodity. So you should probably just make sure youíre car is running optimally (oil change, tire pressure, reduce weight, clean off snow, etc. ) and cross your fingers on breaking even from a cost per unit of energy point of view.

*Unless your vehicle manual says differently, using a higher octane rating just wastes money as well as possibly damaging your car and/or reducing your MPG

**Thereís actually a size difference in the nozzle for diesel that keeps the unaware customer from accidentally filling their gasoline vehicle with a fuel that needs and engine that utilizes completely different combustion mechanism
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Old 07-08-14, 11:24 AM   #22
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So far lifetime average is close to 19mpg (about 18.7) with the wife driving 90% highway. We recently averaged close to 22mpg on a trip from VA to FL and back (about 1600 miles r/t). This is using 93 octane.

Our previous 4runner V8 only averaged ~17 lifetime, but the best it would do on the highway was 18. Despite being almost 1,000lbs heavier, I think our GX is doing damn well to get 22 on the highway.
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Old 07-08-14, 11:24 AM
 
 
 
 
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