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Old 05-06-11, 10:04 PM   #119
motohide
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 05RollaXRS View Post
Thanks so much for all the effort you put into writing your impressions about their comments.
No problem guys!
I do what I can out of enthusiasm!!

Upon revisting the video, here are some of the comments made in the latter Supercar battle scenes.

These are my translation within what I feel "in context" of what they were trying to convey, but may not be accurate in terms of word for word order and direct translations.

"While the GTR had to rely on the launch control to get ahead of the pack at the start, the heavy coupe performed amazingly well among its competition. Notable was the sheer power but not limited to it, as the GTR behaved very predictably with tenacity at amazing rates. Especially in the sections of 180R corner at Fuji that requires a accelerating force combined with high lateral G forces, the car exhibited stability that amazed us all. In comparison, the Corvette lacked the finesse in dealing with the combined chassis loads even though the Corvette was very capable in steady-state cornering, and acceleration in separate individual states."

"The LFA was raced with both traction control and stability assist turned ON, and together it provided a wide margin of stable tractability. Previous laps before qualifying, we did with both OFF, TRACTION ON/Stability OFF, and vice versa and did not result in the overall improvement of laps, only that with the systems off, on a high speed track like Fuji, the driver had to pay much more attention to wild transitions that would keep things a handful to manage. Despite the peaky nature of chassis such as the LFA with mid-front layout and ultralight carbon frame, the LFA in pure form without assist was very predictable however, and exhibited all the responses that an experienced driver would expect. With the systems turned on, the car only became sweeter and easier, allowing you to relax in various stages of the track and enjoy the magnificent sounds and utter stable manners. On the tight chicane at the end of the back straight, there was a tendency to under-steer a bit when the turn in was initiated without enough braking, but in exchange the stability control managed to allow the car to easily get back on line with RWD platform's advantage of not carrying any driving load of mechanical forces, and quickly redirected the car into the second apex at will. You can see this in effect when the Porsche 911 GT2RS had dove into the inside line for almost sure overtake, yet the LFA managed to secure an outside line to stay with the GT2RS side by side, and denied the overtake by closing the line into the second apex of the chicane after the 180R. This is something of a trait usually reserved for FR layout balanced perfectly, which the LFA is pretty close to that perfection."

"The Corvette ZR1 is a sheer rocket when it comes to straight-line acceleration, the car reached 276km/h as we passed the Bridgestone Bridge on the straight just before the massive braking zones, and almost doubted if the car can actually slow enough to get around turn one. KT jokingly said, if the GTR is a twin turbo, the Corvette feels like it has four! Timing of each shift was so busy using a standard clutch that it really needs LESS gears or paddle shifter!!"

"The LFA deserves credit in that in all contortion and loads, low-stability difficulties of attitudes and sheer freaky nature of what FUJI throws on cars at these speeds, the LFA simply cooked all the tricky sections as master chef connecting a dish. Drivers can trust it to go further and the car will show you what not to do, by gently allowing you to correct without fear. Within a few laps, all of us got enough feedback by pushing beyond the ideal, and found where it is happiest. And with that knowledge, each lap just becomes better and better for most drivers. It is a spectacular car in that respect, and unlike other hard-edged cars in this field, the LFA is the car suited for learning, at all levels."

"LFA might be, the BEST sounding production car engine, in the WORLD"

"Nissan GTR (R35), has evolved from 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, and now 2011... each step seeming to improve on something most of us thought was not possible. Yes it still is a big heavy car with AWD and quirks, but what it puts down on asphalt as performance, is something of a miracle. While the car may not improve on speeds and specs each edition, the precision and comfort levels keep improving each year. The newest 2011, with the ($45,000) premium option of EGOIST package, the chassis is even more poised for comfort, while losing none of the speed, and even improving precise feel of the car in tighter sections"

"Porsche 911 GT2RS in tradition of Porsche, raises the same excellent handling character to another level. Being the most simple of the cars here, it still managed to stay within the pack, right down to the last lap. The braking forces and acceleration forces are its forte, and thus one must always be aware that this car needs to be driven in a unique way which is the traits needed for any Porsche Meister"

"Corvette ZR1 changed the way I see American sports cars. It is no longer cheap in feel, and handling characteristics are still unique but isn't really something you can ridicule anymore. It is world class in every right, without losing its identity, something they should be proud."

"The prancing horse Ferrari 360 and 430 has always displayed a wild, razor edge handling, making the drivers very careful and alert in the past on FUJI. Notably the front traction sometimes surprisingly lacking, it was always a car you steered with the rear end, despite the eager tendencies to swap front to tail for diving too eagerly. This F430 has been reworked by RSD tamed it somewhat, and reducing radius corners became fun, even for a car like the F430."
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